Marshall Bluesbreaker 2×12 Vintage Combo – 1962

The sound that launched the British blues invasion. The Marshall 1962 Bluesbreaker Combo Amp is just like the one used by Eric Clapton during his stint with Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and famously on the Beano sessions.

$4,999.99

Description

Marshall Bluesbreaker 2×12 Vintage Combo

Description

The sound that launched the British blues invasion. The Marshall 1962 Bluesbreaker Combo Amp is just like the one used by Eric Clapton during his stint with Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and famously on the Beano sessions. With 30W output and 2×12 speakers, it produces a gutsy bass and vibrant top, coupled with an overall natural warmth. The valve rectification output stage, pioneered by Marshall in the early 1960s, is responsible for helping achieve the famed compression and sustain exhibited uniquely by both the JTM45 and 1962. Though somewhat tonally similar to a JTM45, the 1962 combo is loaded with 2 Celestion Greenback 25W speakers and also comes with a footswitchable tremolo effect. If you’re looking for that sensuous, creamy early Clapton sound, we guarantee that you’ll find it in this beautifully reissued Marshall combo. The natural tone and overdrive of the 1962 Bluesbreaker Amp will quickly become a fundamental ingredient in your overall sound.
  • 30W output
  • 2 – 12″ 25W Celestion Greenback speakers
  • Valve rectifier
  • Footswitchable tremolo effect

Brand

Marshall

Marshall is a British company that designs and manufactures music amplifiers, speaker cabinets, brands personal headphones and earphones, drums and bongos. The company also owns a record label called Marshall Records.[4] It was founded in London by drum shop owner and drummer, Jim Marshall, and is now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes, England. Marshall's guitar amplifiers are among the most recognised in the world. Their signature sound – characterised by sizzling distortion and "crunch" – was conceived after guitarists, such as Pete Townshend, visited Marshall's drum shop complaining that the guitar amplifiers then on the market did not have the right sound or enough volume. After gaining publicity, Marshall guitar amplifiers and loudspeaker cabinets were sought by guitarists for this new sound and increased volume. Many of the current and reissue Marshall guitar amplifiers continue to use valves, as is common in this market sector. Marshall also manufactures less expensive solid-state, hybrid (vacuum tube and solid state) and modelling amplifiers.