Marshall SV20H Studio Vintage 20W Head SV20H

The Marshall Studio Vintage SV20H captures the infamous ‘Plexi’ Super Lead valve tone of the mid 1960’s Standard Series amp, the 1959SLP, and shrinks into a super-affordable version for the modern player.

$2,149.99

Description

Marshall SV20H Studio Vintage 20W Head

The Marshall Studio Vintage SV20H captures the infamous ‘Plexi’ Super Lead valve tone of the mid 1960’s Standard Series amp, the 1959SLP, and shrinks into a super-affordable version for the modern player. Based on an amp that inspired generations of iconic guitarists, the Marshall 1959SLP. Marshall Studio Vintage amps deliver the unmistakable tone shaping and harmonics that are expected from the 1959SLP in a portable format. The new SV20H is great for saturated blues tones to biting leads for classic rock, featuring four separate inputs for you to blend your sound, distinctive EQ settings including presence control, a DI output and power reduction.
  • 2 x ECC83, 1 x ECC83 (phase splitter) and 2x EL34 Valves
  • Single channel with 4 separate inputs
  • High and Low sensitivity loudness controls
  • 20W or 5W Power Output Switch
  • Treble, middle, bass and presence EQ
  • 5 x 1/4” jack sockets (16ohm load / 8ohm load / 4ohm load)
  • DI output
  • Weight: 9.25kg
  • Dimensions: 240 x 500 x 230mm

Brand

Marshall

Marshall is a British company that designs and manufactures music amplifiers, speaker cabinets, brands personal headphones and earphones, drums and bongos. The company also owns a record label called Marshall Records.[4] It was founded in London by drum shop owner and drummer, Jim Marshall, and is now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes, England. Marshall's guitar amplifiers are among the most recognised in the world. Their signature sound – characterised by sizzling distortion and "crunch" – was conceived after guitarists, such as Pete Townshend, visited Marshall's drum shop complaining that the guitar amplifiers then on the market did not have the right sound or enough volume. After gaining publicity, Marshall guitar amplifiers and loudspeaker cabinets were sought by guitarists for this new sound and increased volume. Many of the current and reissue Marshall guitar amplifiers continue to use valves, as is common in this market sector. Marshall also manufactures less expensive solid-state, hybrid (vacuum tube and solid state) and modelling amplifiers.